Vaya Build Specs

Since posting the Vaya One-Year Review, I’ve received quite a few questions about the bike’s build specs.  So for all the gear-heads, here are the details:

  • Frame/fork: Salsa Vaya, 57cm
  • Headset: Cane Creek S-3
  • Cranks: Shimano FC-R4550 with T.A. chainrings (34/46)
  • Bottom bracket: Shimano Dura-Ace BB7900
  • Chain: KMC X9.93
  • Cassette: SRAM PG-990 9-speed (11-32)
  • Brake/shift levers: Campagnolo Centaur Power-Shift Ergopower 10-speed
  • Cables/housing: Jagwire Ripcord
  • Brakes: Avid BB7 road (w/Avid organic pads)
  • Front derailleur: Campagnolo Centaur (w/Problem Solvers clamp)
  • Rear Derailleur: daVinci/SRAM X9
  • Hubs: Sun/Ringle Dirty Flea (32h, 135mm rear spacing)
  • Rims: Sun/Ringle EQ23 (700C, 32h)
  • Spokes: DT double-butted (brass nipples)
  • Tires: Varies
  • Seatpost: Ritchey Classic (27.2mm)
  • Saddle: Selle An-Atomica Titanico (clydesdale version)
  • Stem: Velo-Orange 80mm x 17-deg (31.8mm)
  • Handlebars: Ritchey Classic Curve 44cm (31.8mm)
  • Accessories: King stainless bottle cages, Lezyne Pressure Drive pump, Garmin 500 computer

Things I Like: da Vinci Custom SRAM Derailleur

There are a number of ways to mix-and-match Campagnolo Ergpower levers with an otherwise-Shimano drivetrain.  Options include from alternate cable routing, conversion cassettes, and cable-pull adapters.  I’ve experimented with several of those methods, but my favorite way to pair Ergopower levers with Shimano running gear is da Vinci’s custom SRAM derailleur.

Starting with a medium- or long-cage SRAM X9 derailleur, da Vinci replaces the stock cable guide with a special CNC-machined guide that allows the different brands’ components to play nicely in the same sandbox.  The derailleur is available in versions for 10-speed Campagnolo or 10-speed Shimano levers (both are compatible with Shimano or SRAM 9-speed cassettes).

GRAVELBIKE.com gravel bike sram davinci rear derailleur shimano shimergo campagnolo
da Vinci’s custom SRAM derailleur waiting to be paired with 3rd-generation Centaur 10-speed levers.

Installing the custom SRAM derailleur is similar to installing any other modern derailleur (and takes less trial-and-error than cable-pull modifers or alternate routing)  The only real difference is that you’ll need to account for your particular shifter’s “extra” click.  On my bikes, I usually set them up so that the phantom click occurs after the shift to the largest cog.

The da Vinci derailleur controlled by 2nd-generation Centaur levers (with an 11-32 cassette).

Shifting with the da Vinci derailleur is spot on.  I’ve used the derailleurs successfully with 2nd- and 3rd-generation Ergopower levers, and both Shimano and SRAM 9-speed cassettes (with KMC, Shimano, and SRAM chains).  And because the standard SRAM X9 derailleur is targeted to mountain bikers, it can easily handle 32- and 34-tooth large cogs (and wraps plenty of chain for double- and triple-chainring cranks).

If you’re a Campy fan and you want wider-range gearing, compatibility with 135mm rear hubs, or the increased longevity from 9-speed cassettes and chains, the da Vinci custom is definitely worth considering.

For more information, contact da Vinci Designs.