Things I Like: Ritchey Logic Curve Handlebars

I am a creature of habit.  When I find something I like, I tend to stick with it.  It’s that way with saddles, pedals, and drop-style handlebars.  When it comes to the latter, my bar-of-choice is the Ritchey Logic Curve model.

GRAVELBIKE.com gravel grinder Ritchey Logic Classic Curve Campagnolo Ergopower Centaur Salsa Vaya Jagwire

Ritchey’s Logic Curve bars feature a short reach (73mm) and shallow drop (128mm).  I’ve used 2nd- and 3rd-generation Campagnolo Ergopower levers with the Logic Curve bars, and when set up with the ramps flat, the transition to and from the hoods is pretty much seamless.  Moving to the drops is easy thanks to the double-radius profile.

GRAVELBIKE.com gravel grinder Ritchey Logic Comp Curve Campagnolo Ergopower Centaur Black Mountain Cycles Jagwire

Ritchey offers the Logic Curve in several models and finishes.  All feature a 31.8mm center section, and no-slip grit at the stem and brake lever mounting surfaces.  Widths range from 38cm to 44cm (measured center/center at the levers).  While some riders may bemoan the lack of cable grooves, I find that it allows for more freedom when positioning the levers and routing the cables.

My Classic Logic Curve bars have been in service for three years, and not once have they slipped or creaked.  Despite swapping my Comp Logic Curve bars between between several bikes and stems, they’re as secure and silent as the first time I installed them.  Both pairs bars have seen lots of bumpy, off-road miles, and I’ve been unable to detect any unwanted flex.

If you’re looking for a versatile, short-and-shallow drop bar that’s also comfortable in the drops, do yourself a favor and check out Ritchey Logic Curve line of handlebars.

Update: Shimano Dura-Ace Bottom Bracket Review

Last May, I posted a one-year review of Shimano’s Dura-Ace SM-BB7900 bottom bracket.  Since then, that original bottom bracket has accumulated an additional 2500-3000 miles.  It’s been ridden in rain and snow, and seen plenty of hard, off-pavement use.  And just like the previous twelve months, I employed a maintenance program that basically amounted to complete and utter neglect.

Eventually, curiosity got the best of me, and I decided to check the bottom bracket’s seals and bearings.  Pulling the Vaya’s cranks revealed very little dirt on the external seals (and no uneven wear patterns).  After a quick wipe-down, I checked the bearings for signs of play or roughness.  To my amazement, I wasn’t able to detect any indication that dirt or water had infiltrated either bearing.  By contrast, a comparably priced external bottom bracket from another company became contaminated by water and dirt (and was devoid of lube) in ten months and less than 1000 miles of use.

If my original Dura-Ace bottom bracket lasts another year, it will have cost me just under $1 per-month.  And based on the past two years’ performance, I wouldn’t be surprised if it kept going for at least another couple of years.

Things I Like: DeFeet UnD Shurt Base Layer

I am not what you would call a fair-weather rider.  Whether it’s below freezing or when the mercury hits the triple digits, I love riding my bicycle.  And whatever the weather, DeFeet’s UnD Shurt base layer has been my go-to gear for remaining dry and comfortable.

GRAVELBIKE.com DeFeet UnD Shurt base layer

Weighing only a few ounces, the UnD Shurt takes up very little room under form-fitting jerseys or other clothing.  The athletic cut is slim, but-comfortable, and there’s no annoying bunching or “riding up.”  And despite being whispery-thin, it’s not fragile, nor does it require special care.  One of my tank-style base layers has seen near-daily use for over a year, and is still going strong.

DeFeet recommends the UnD Shurt for 40° to 80° weather, and I’d say that their ratings are a little conservative.  While it may not offer as much warmth as the company’s UnD Wool model, it does an excellent job of keeping you dry when you’re layered-up for winter conditions (which there are no shortage of here in Colorado).  As someone who tends to sweat profusely, I’ve found that the UnD Shurt is ideal for staying dry and comfortable.

For more information on DeFeet’s entire range of base layers, please visit DeFeet’s website.