Tag Archives: One-Year Review

One-Year Review: Ortlieb Front-Roller Plus Panniers

If you ride long or far enough you’ll eventually want–or need–to carry more than will fit in your jersey pockets or under-seat pack. For commuting and extended exploring, panniers offer convenience, security, and the capacity to carry your essentials and much more. Since 1983, Ortlieb has produced what many consider to be some of the best panniers available. The company offers a staggering array of bags, and I spent the past twelve months testing Ortlieb’s Front-Roller Plus panniers.

Constructed from abrasion-resistant Cordura fabric utilizing high-frequency welding, the Front-Roller Plus panniers ($180 MSRP) feature a 25 litre capacity (per-pair) and weigh a respectable 640 grams (each). The QL2.1 mounting system is compatible with racks up to 16 mm in diameter, and can be adjusted without tools. Niceties include padded (removable) shoulder straps, integrated interior pockets, and 3M™ Scotchlite™ reflectors. Like Ortlieb’s other panniers, the Front-Roller Plus comes with a five-year warranty.

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Updates & Follow-Ups

Campagnolo Drivetrain Conversion
The Campagnolo Centaur Ergopower shifters have broken in nicely. Shifting is even smoother, but the reassuring tactile feedback definitely remains. Maintenance has consisted of occasionally lubing the cables and (derailleur) pivots, and rotating in another KMC X10.93 chain to minimize overall drivetrain wear. I did replace the 46t Real outer chainring with a 48t Specialites T.A. Zephyr ‘ring. The latter shifts quicker, and is a better match for the 13-29t Veloce cassette.

Pacenti SL23 Rims
These wheels are still as true as the day I received them. The White Industries T11 hubs haven’t required any adjustment or lubrication, and the freehub has quieted down slightly (but it’s still louder than, say, a Shimano unit). Brake track wear appears minimal despite testing half-a-dozen different brake pad compounds. I’ve read reports that some people have difficulty mounting tires on the SL23 rims, but switching to thinner rim strip (e.g. Stan’s yellow tape) usually eases installation.

Carradice SQR Saddlebags
Since posting my original review, I’ve put another 600 miles on the SQR Slim saddlebag. With its spacious capacity and easy on/off mounting system, it’s become my favorite bag in the Carradice family. Traversing dirt roads and trails on over-inflated 28mm tires hasn’t loosened the mounting hardware, and the waxed cotton fabric has done a great job of fending off late-afternoon thundershowers. I continue to notice the bag brushing the backs of my thighs, but it’s usually restricted to when I remain in the saddle when stopped.

Update: Shimano Dura-Ace Bottom Bracket Review

Last May, I posted a one-year review of Shimano’s Dura-Ace SM-BB7900 bottom bracket.  Since then, that original bottom bracket has accumulated an additional 2500-3000 miles.  It’s been ridden in rain and snow, and seen plenty of hard, off-pavement use.  And just like the previous twelve months, I employed a maintenance program that basically amounted to complete and utter neglect.

Eventually, curiosity got the best of me, and I decided to check the bottom bracket’s seals and bearings.  Pulling the Vaya’s cranks revealed very little dirt on the external seals (and no uneven wear patterns).  After a quick wipe-down, I checked the bearings for signs of play or roughness.  To my amazement, I wasn’t able to detect any indication that dirt or water had infiltrated either bearing.  By contrast, a comparably priced external bottom bracket from another company became contaminated by water and dirt (and was devoid of lube) in ten months and less than 1000 miles of use.

If my original Dura-Ace bottom bracket lasts another year, it will have cost me just under $1 per-month.  And based on the past two years’ performance, I wouldn’t be surprised if it kept going for at least another couple of years.