First Impressions: absoluteBLACK Oval Chainring (Part-I)

Despite a recent resurgence in popularity, oval chainrings are not new technology. Dating as far back as 1890, non-round chainrings have made numerous appearances in the marketplace, with the most in/famous being Shimano’s Biopace. More recently, oval rings enjoyed a boost in popularity when professional road racers Chris Froome and Sir Bradley Wiggins used non-round rings in their quests for Tour de France victories. And now, oval chainrings such as those offered by absoluteBLACK are seeing more use among off-road riders.

Why would someone choose an oval chainring instead of a round chainring. According to absoluteBLACK’s founder Marcin Golec, cyclists don’t produce even power throughout their pedal stroke. His company’s oval chainrings maximize the portion of the stroke where power is produced, and minimize resistance where there is less power. In layman’s terms, the ring is effectively larger where the rider has the most leverage (or power), and smaller where the rider has the least leverage/power. Unlike some competitors’ oval rings, absoluteBLACK does not rely on a single timing and ovality setting for all chainring sizes. Each chainring size has a slightly different setting, which is optimized for the intended usage.

Continue reading

2016 Light Roundup: Part-I

It’s no secret that bicycle light technology has improved by leaps and bounds. The current crop of lights have more power, run longer, and cost less than last year’s offerings. Whether you’re a hardcore commuter or avid recreational rider, there’s bound to be a light that fits your budget and requirements.

Lights generally fall into one of two categories–see by, and be seen lights. The former are brighter, and enable the rider ride safely in areas without ambient light sources (e.g streetlights). The latter, on the other hand, are mostly used for improving cyclists’ visibility in low-light conditions (think urban riding).

Manufacturers specify light output in lumens. Generally, the more lumens, the brighter the light. For my testing, I separated the lights by output. Those lights with a rating of less than 100 lumens were considered be seen lights, while lights rated over 100 lumens were classified as see by lights. This installment covers the lights with 100+ lumens, and Part-II will feature lights with outputs of less than 100 lumens.

Model Max Output
(lumens)
Weight
(grams)
Price
(USD)
Bontrager Ion 700 RT 700 142 $139.99
CatEye Volt 800 800 152 $130.00
CatEye Volt 1200 1200 235 $220.00
Knog Blinder Arc 640 640 150 $119.95
Knog Blinder Road 250 250 75 $79.95
Planet Bike Blaze 650 XLR 650 128 $94.99

Continue reading